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When Junaid Hafeez Passionately Spoke About The Courage To Take A ‘Rebellious Path’

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In an interview with a Radio channel FM 103 aired back in 2010, now incarcerated Fulbright Professor Junaid Hafeez had passionately spoken about his academic achievements and life interests. He was invited as a guest on basis of his many achievements as a student. The interview is being circulated on social media in the wake of Junaid Hafeez’s death sentence awarded by a local court in Multan which has been termed disappointing by rights activist.

From the interview, Junaid Hafeez comes across as a bright, progressive young man with big goals in life.
The host started the interview by sharing how Hafeez obtained a gold medal in his FSc examinations, which he said was a moment of pride for him.

Further in the interview, Junaid Hafeez shares that he later took admission in King Edward Medical University, where he did well but his heart was not in the medical profession.
He quit the medical university and started studying English Literature at Bahauddin Zakaria University in Multan. In response to a question about switching fields, Hafeez had said that students of arts have a courage to take a rebellious path, like the one mentioned in Robert Frost’s poem ‘The Road Less Taken’. “They don’t fear getting hurt on that path. They have the capacity to fall and get back up,” he had said.

Interview of Juniad Hafeez on 'Music on Wheels' at Radio FM-103

Interview of Juniad Hafeez on 'Music on Wheels' at Radio FM-103 aired on 15th January, 2010

Posted by Ali Camus on Saturday, November 24, 2018

He wrote a romantic poem called ‘To You’, which was published in a UAE magazine.
He opined that when we join a field, we should not do it just to obtain grades, but to implement what we have learned to make society better and not ‘claustrophobic.’

READ  US State Dept 'Deeply Concerned' With Junaid Hafeez's Death Sentence

He also talked of his time doing theatre when he was in Jackson University. He reminisced over how once when he did a play doing the role of a neighbour, he got a standing ovation at the end and the crowd resonated with chants expressing love for the character he played.

Junaid also opined that students of arts are democratic, in the sense that they choose their profession by listening to their hearts. This, he said, stood in contrast to those who pursued common fields, imposed on them by a dictatorial mindset.

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